Interestingly, the enzyme activity of strain TA1 was increased by

Interestingly, the enzyme activity of strain TA1 was increased by 1.9-fold in the presence of Mg2+ at a final concentration of 1 mM and was partially inhibited by 1 mM (40%) or 5 mM (45%) EDTA. This implies that Mg2+ contributed to the stability of TA1 enzyme. Therefore, TA1 enzyme experiments were conducted in the presence of Mg2+ at a final selleck kinase inhibitor concentration of 5 mM. There was no effect on the enzyme activity of strain

TM1 in the presence of Mg2+ or EDTA. Pseudomonas fluorescens BTP9 produces some amount of VDH as reported previously. The activities of purified and reported enzymes were constitutively detected in P. fluorescens BTP9, and their subunit molecular mass (55 kDa) was similar to that of enzymes from strains TA1 and TM1. However, the enzyme from strain BTP9 was a tetramer like that from strain TA1. It has been reported that the enzyme activity in strain BTP9 was not influenced by Mg2+ or a chelating agent; however, the enzyme activity was approximately doubled in strain TA1 in the presence of Mg2+(Bare et al., 2002). The optimum temperature and pH for enzyme activity were estimated from vanillin oxidation. The enzyme from strain TA1 demonstrated ERK inhibitor chemical structure the highest activity around 30 °C; however, the enzyme from TM1 demonstrated high activity across a wide range of temperatures, i.e. from 35 to 60 °C. The thermal stability of enzyme was investigated by measuring

its residual activity after incubation for 30 min at each temperature. The enzyme from strain TM1 was stable up to 35 °C, which was higher than the enzyme from strain TA1, which was stable up to 30 °C (Fig. 3). Both enzymes showed optimum activity between pH 9 and

10; however, the enzyme from strain TA1 was the most stable within a pH range of 7–8, whereas the enzyme from strain TM1 was the most stable within a pH range of 6–9 for a 30-min incubation at 30 °C (Fig. 4). The results suggest that the enzyme from strain TA1 exhibited oxidation activity specifically under alkaline conditions, although it was stable under neutral conditions. These results suggest that the enzyme from strain TM1 Molecular motor showed higher temperature and pH stability compared with that from strain TA1. The Michaelis–Menten constant (Km) and the maximum velocity (Vmax) of both enzymes were determined by photometric assays because this method allows a more accurate measurement of initial velocities with nonsaturating substrate concentrations than the HPLC method. The Km of enzymes from strains TA1 and TM1 for vanillin were 0.007 and 0.004 mM, respectively, under neutral conditions. The Vmax of enzymes from strains TA1 and TM1 for vanillin were 0.39 and 1.3 μmol min−1 mg−1 protein, respectively, under neutral conditions. Several aromatic aldehydes were used as substrates to compare the substrate specificity and measure the activities of purified enzymes from both strains (Table 2).

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